Category: Blog

ADDING AWARDS TO A COMMUNICATION STRATEGY

It’s hard to miss the glitz and glamour of the ongoing movie award season. Every broadcaster, radio station, magazine and social media platform is trying to ride the wave of the public’s unwavering interest in the rich and famous.

But despite these celebrities seemingly living a life we mere mortals can only dream of; it’s still surprising to see how much pride and joy they feel when receiving an award. More importantly, the viewer will register and remember who the winners are.

A movie or television show is much more appealing to the viewer if it has already been dubbed as ‘award-winning’. This forms an expectation that it is of a high quality. The same rules apply in the business world.

Winning awards adds credibility

As we live in such a connected and digitalised society, businesses can be subject to a thorough background search by practically any potential customer or client. Hence why it’s crucial for businesses to pursue opportunities to be awarded. Any type of special recognition will significantly help when differentiating themselves from competitors.

As such, awards must become a priority. Pursuing awards often falls under a company’s communication strategy, which will be implemented by their in-house marketing team or external PR agency.

Raising a company’s profile

PR agencies are brought in to raise a company’s profile, increase their brand awareness and secure as much media coverage as possible. As award submissions can require a lot of work, which has the potential to garner zero results, there is a risk of letting them fall off the agenda.

To prevent this from happening, the company and PR agency must be aligned in understanding the benefits of winning awards and where it fits within a communications strategy.

Below are three key tips to integrate award submissions into a long-term PR campaign;

Securing Earned media coverage

  • Shortlisted companies in for each awards category will be featured multiple times in the media as part of the build up to the event
  • Media coverage will continue for those that are announced overall winners
  • Awards are a useful way of securing organically generated coverage
  • Promotes companies within industry and wider business community
  • Builds brand awareness and increases overall profile
  • Increases visibility among competitors and industry leaders
  • Can be used as a way to introduce the company to prospects and customers

Social media

  • Promoting an award shortlisting or win on social media platforms to notify existing followers about the newly gained credentials will almost certainly attract attention and engagement
  • Can be used to attract new followers, which could be converted to new customers
  • Allows the company to add more personality to posts on social media i.e. celebratory gifs
  • Enables a company to engage directly with followers, thanking them for the support
  • Reshare media coverage of the shortlisting and win, adding in the awards # to engage with other nominees and attendees

Website/blog copy

  • Feature copy of shortlisting and win in the news section of website is a good way of increasing visibility with new and existing customers or clients
  • Repurpose copy for a blog post
  • Enhances a company’s reputation within its specific industry and distinguishes them from the competition
  • Validates services or products a company offers
  • Use links to blog and news section in social media post to draw traffic to website

Having a positive impact from awards

Winning awards can not only impact new business, but it can also have a positive effect on employees, senior team members and the company as a whole. They must not be overlooked. A robust communications strategy must place emphasis on award submissions, and if they are done right, the long-term impact can be extremely beneficial.

For more information about how Open Communications works with businesses and brands of all sizes please call a member of the team.

YOU DON’T NEED PR IN MANUFACTURING

Manufacturing business

Manufacturing businesses are some of the most exciting companies in the country. Not only do they produce products, their organisations are full of innovation, automation, talent and aspiration. That is why it is so baffling that there continues to be a belief that you don’t need PR in manufacturing.

It doesn’t really matter what you produce, when I walk out onto a factory floor I am always mesmerised. There is so much going on. It’s not just about the process or the flow of the production process, it’s the smells and the sounds too.
Working in manufacturing

Starting my career in a print factory, I had the chance to work with operators, team leaders, warehouse operatives and managers. All had a story to share and experiences that brought their tales to life.

Since that time, I have worked with many companies that rely on the expertise of machine operators, engineers, production managers and operations directors. Understanding what a significant part they play in the success of an organisation is just half of the battle.

Working with manufacturers

As a PR agency we take this insight and shape content that will generate earned and owned coverage. As such the story needs to be compelling enough for journalists to want to print it and for visitors to want to read it.

The challenge that we have when we are delivering PR in manufacutring companies is that many of them don’t see what incredible work they do. They come to work, do a day’s graft and go home. Some of these organisations are more than a hundred years old. Although times have changed and processes have progressed, they still see their day job as the same as it was before.

Trying to explain to some businesses that they need to communicate with customers, to share their story and to allow their brand to resonate falls on deaf ears. Some don’t feel they need to bother, and others just don’t know where to start.

Making the most of every opportunity

In a world where we are surrounded by opportunities to communicate, whether that be online, in print or across digital platforms, we should be making the most of it. Instead, a lot of companies simply stick to what they are good at.

The truth is that many manufacturers run as a business and forget the relevance and commercial value of creating a brand. In some instances, they feel that talk of marketing and

PR is ‘the fluffy stuff’ they don’t need to bother with. Not only is this untrue, it could be very damaging.

Supporting the reputation of a business

PR supports the reputation of a brand and business. It provides insight into a company, its values and ambitions. It isn’t just a sales tool, it is a vehicle to share a story and to attract talent. Saying nothing doesn’t mean that nothing will get said, it simply means you won’t control the message.

I’ve come across a lot of small to medium sized manufacturers that have said they can’t afford PR. I always respond in the same way; you invest in an accountant to ensure that you are financially stable and compliant, PR is no less important.

Perhaps you do need PR in manufacturing

Manufacturing is a complex industry and there are often a lot of secrets. It may be workflow, innovative products, configuration of machinery or just the need to keep trade secrets. This doesn’t negate the need for PR, nor does it mean that a story can’t be shared.

What we do with our clients that work in the sector is to identify what we can say and to create a year-round schedule of activity that keeps their brand front of mind. We don’t target one audience, we target many and make sure that our messaging resonates where it should.

Over the years we have secured some incredible results for our clients and we’ve had a lot of fun. For those that are debating what PR could do for their business I would encourage you to get in touch. We have lots of examples to share that just may help you to change your mind.

#THISGIRLCAN CREATES A MOVEMENT THAT’S HARD TO IGNORE

Image to represent the philosophy behind #ThisGirlCan

I have long been a follower and advocate of the #ThisGirlCan campaign. After fives years of generated content and inspiring millions of followers, I’d go as far as to say that it has become a movement.

Launched in 2015 by Sport England, it had the objective to ‘break the mould of how women were portrayed’ and to encourage more to become active. Not only did it reach that target, it very much exceeded it.

With snappy and shareable content such as ‘Sweating like a pig, feeling like a fox’ there was no doubt of the message.

The creative had something for everyone. Whatever your preference and however hard or exhilarating you found exercise, you could identify with the women in the advert.

https://www.thedrum.com/news/2020/01/15/girl-can-marketer-how-shes-keeping-the-5-year-idea-fresh?utm_campaign=Newsletter_Daily_EuropeAM&utm_source=pardot&utm_medium=email

Maintaining momentum

Having a successful campaign is worth celebrating but it is also the hardest position to be in. Not only do you need to do the same again, you also need to build on what has been achieved.

Far from hanging up their running shoes, the team behind this multi-award-winning marketing movement have continued to launch adverts every year. The theme remains the same, but the focus has a subtle shift to appeal to the widest audience possible.

The latest instalment to hit our screens went live from 14 January and this time focuses on the barriers to exercise.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=2&v=4BKwk8q4H0Y&feature=emb_logo

Remembering your audience

The one thing the creatives could do to destroy this campaign it to get too clever. There are so many ideas you could come up. After all, unlike when it launched, they now have millions of followers who are actively engaged.

The trick however is to remain authentic.

Shifting this from an honest message to an agency that wants to try out some new techniques just wouldn’t work. The message is raw, and it resonates.

Thankfully, those working on the campaign look to those that are best qualified to influence the next instalment; the audience.

Keeping it real

There are a number of subtle elements to this advert. Not to be confused with another advert for women’s products, it really does keep it real. There are women with period pains, mothers with young babies and even a tampon string that all make an appearance.

Going back to basics, without overdoing the message, these signposts give those watching the nudge they might need to think about becoming more active.

The beauty of the #ThisGirlCan movement is that from the outset it has been inclusive. It isn’t about shaming or blaming, it is about doing what you can, when you can. It has made exercise accessible for all, whatever size, shape, race or capability you have.

Building the community on the ground

I’ve said already that I am a huge fan of this advert. It appeals to me in a way that no other has. What I would like to see now is how this can be delivered on the ground.

The adverts capture the essence of the #ThisGirlCan creative but seeing this in practice would take it to a whole new level. This isn’t about sponsoring lots of community-based sports programmes, it is about taking a movement and making it work harder.

Tapping into the audiences that are now engaged would be an obvious starting point. The website does signpost to activities in the local area, however I feel there needs to be more of a personal touch to this activation.

It feels to me like there needs to be the #ThisGirlCan equivalent of the Race For Life, which is another activity I endorse wholeheartedly. Although almost impossible to manage, bringing the community together in person would be a true measure of success for me.

#ThisGirlCan and this girl will

As an agency we are constantly reviewing brand activity, not only from our clients but also competitors. Every day there is a new idea that we share or a concept that has been brought to life that we feel is worthy of a ping around the office email.

The difference with #ThisGirlCan for me is that it doesn’t just appeal, it turns my thoughts into action. It makes me want to go out and to do something. It challenges my excuses and it gives me reason to get my trainers back out of the cupboard.

For a marketing message to have that power Sport England are certainly doing something right and I look forward to seeing what more they have planned throughout the year.

GENERATION Z: THE TRANSPARENCY OBSESSED DEMOGRAPHIC

They might not be your target audience. But here’s why you can’t ignore them.

Not long-ago marketeers were completely and utterly infatuated by millennials. Trying to figure out who they were, what they liked and most importantly how to sell to them. But the interest in this ‘challenging’ target audience has since faded.

It’s all about Gen Z now.

Born between 1995 and 2015, Gen Z are the latest craze. From their specific food interests and tech savvy lifestyle to their passion for saving the planet. This new generation has definitely disrupted the marketplace.

But I sell hardware, why would I care about a bunch of ‘teenagers’?

Well, simply because today’s ‘teenagers’ will be tomorrows trendsetters! In fact, give it a few years and they’ll be your customers. And the quicker you come to terms with this, the better for your brand.

Here’s the tricky part…

Generation Z’s interest in a business go far beyond face value. Yes, they care about the products and services on offer. But what’s more important is the philosophy behind the brand.

To put things into perspective, let’s take KFC as an example. The fast food giant jumped on the vegan bandwagon this year with the launch of its vegan ‘chicken’ burger. Since the announcement KFC has faced major backlash.

Consumers took to social media to question why on earth anyone following a vegan ideology would eat from an establishment notorious for mass slaughter of chickens and factory farming. It just wouldn’t make sense.

This attempt at cashing in on the latest trend may have worked in the past, but not any longer. As we proceed into a brand-new decade, its simply not enough. It’s apparent that people are now more conscious of their choices than they have ever been. What’s more, this mindfulness is not going anywhere. Certainly not with the new generation.

So, what’s the solution?

With Gen Z on the search for a more sustainable, ethical and meaningful consumerism, the need for transparency is more important than ever.

Brands must be prepared to make the shift from a ‘black box’ to a ‘glass box’, allowing consumers to easily see inside. From the processes put in place to the values reflected, Gen Z want behind the scene access before deciding whether they want to purchase a product or not.

Once this shift has been made and consumers like what they see in the glass box that is your brand, you’ll have bagged yourself the most populous generation.

Living in a connected world means we can no longer hide from the consequences of our decisions. Every purchase we make has an impact on society, on the planet and even on ourselves. So, it’s only logical for the next generation to be more aware when it comes to spending their money and importantly where.

PR CONTINUES TO BE UNDERVALUED AROUND THE BOARDROOM TABLE

PR can often be an outcast and certainly underrepresented around the boardroom table. An unnecessary investment that cuts deep into company budgets. Granted, it can be difficult to measure the true success of a PR campaign but, without developing and maintaining a positive reputation, a company’s image can be put at risk.

The public’s perception has never been so vital to a business’ success and longevity. And as technological advancements continue to merge with our daily lives, the heat of the spotlight is only set to increase even more.

So, what does this mean?

There is very little room for mistakes. Whether it’s a lack of engagement on social media, a refusal to evolve services or an inability to attract new business, garnering a negative perception can often be led to the downfall of any organisation.

But there is hope! This can all be successfully and robustly manged using an effective PR campaign.

The purpose of PR

First of all, companies must determine what they want to achieve from a PR campaign. Versatile by nature, PR campaigns can be as bespoke as needed depending on the specific objectives an organisation intends to meet.

This can be anything from launching a new product, introducing an enhanced service, promoting a special event or the desire to increase the company’s profile and build brand awareness. Gone are the days when a humble press release was the most effective way to communicate with the public. Now a strategic and proactive approach must be implemented in order for a PR campaign to be successful.

Below is a list of things to consider when putting together a public relations plan:

  • Identify target audience
  • Target trade media and journalists that are dedicated to your specialism
  • Engage with target audience through regular social media posts
  • Position yourself as an expert through thought leadership pieces
  • React and comment on topical issues within your field or area
  • Pursue industry-specific award submissions
  • Create more personal and engaging blog posts
  • Pursue interview opportunities with press
  • Create NEWSWORTHY content about your business

Compiling these points into a step-by-step process, which are then scheduled and executed accordingly, will undoubtedly help a company build towards achieving its initial objective.

It is important to remember, however, that the difference between a poor campaign and a successful campaign is the ability to tell a consistent and compelling story.

This is how companies set themselves apart from direct competitors and stay relevant in the public’s perception.

Telling the story

The foundation of a strong PR campaign will be built on a company’s key message. This needs to be constantly seen and reiterated in any content that is produced. The message can be determined by simply asking why? Why is a company rebranding; expanding the workforce; releasing a new product; investing in IT infrastructure; moving offices; and so on.

Although the newsworthy angle will be to focus on what is currently happening within that company, the underlying messaging is often the reason behind it.

For example, a fashion house may announce the launch of a new store opening that will create 25 new jobs. Although this appears to be strong, albeit relatively straight forward news story, the underlying message may be that the store opening is part of a wider expansion strategy to help the fashion house hit the £5m turnover mark in the next 12 months.

For the duration of the PR campaign, the messaging should constantly echo that the fashion house is set to grow to a £5m business. As this is shared via journalists in the press, through social media, in blogs and other available platforms, the public perception will begin to view this fashion house as a growing and ambitious brand.

Communicating the story of the business can often lead to establishing stronger relationships between customers, members of the media and stakeholders, which in turn will help build brand awareness and customer loyalty. Once a brand establishes a strong following and reputation, the longevity of success will significantly increase.

Back to the boardroom

Taking all of this into account, it could be considered foolish for those with their hands on the budgets to deny a business the opportunity to protect and build its reputation.

The truth is that when PR is embraced and used to meet with the wider objectives of a company it can have a profound impact, not only on the brand profile but also the bottom line.

For more information about how Open Communications works with businesses and brands of all sizes please call a member of the team or email info@opencomms.co.uk.

NEW YEAR, IMPROVED ME?

NEW YEAR, IMPROVED ME?

The arrival of a brand-new year often fills us with immense motivation. And so, from the first day of January, most of us embark on a pretty ambitious journey.

Determined to get fitter, healthier, happier, we create resolutions. Often this is done to eliminate bad habits and establish better ones. Some practical, some slightly unrealistic.

Personally, I like the tradition of creating new year’s resolutions. I think wanting to improve yourself is great. Although self-improvement should be an all year-round quest, I can understand how for many people, a new year almost feels like a blank slate.

A fresh start.

This year, I’m partaking in the hype. While I am not planning on making any elaborate changes, I have decided to take the start of 2020 as an opportunity to begin incorporating better practices into my daily life.

Here are a few things I want to do this year:

  • Spend more time with family and friends
  • Cook more
  • Take more pictures
  • Drink less coffee
  • Stay consistent at the gym
  • Sign up for a charity run
  • Not check my work email on weekends…

Though it may seem that New Year’s resolutions are made to be forgotten, fingers crossed I can follow through with mine!

Whatever your resolutions may be, I hope that 2020 brings everything you’ve hoped for and more!

Happy New Year everyone. 😊

 

PLANNING A PR CAMPAIGN THAT RESONATES WITH MULTIPLE AUDIENCES

Having put budget behind a consumer-focused campaign, it’s natural to want to maximise that investment. Planning a PR campaign that reaches as many of your target audience as possible is a great way to do this, often making for very impressive results!

 

Imagine, for example, that your product is a toy which appeals to 5-7-year olds. Not only would you want to showcase the toy to children in that age group, but it is also important that you target the parent as well. After all, they’re the ones with the spending power.

 

In addition, grandparents are known to be rather generous. Particularly when it comes to Christmas and birthday presents. Therefore, it would be wise to ensure that they are aware of your product too.

 

So, how do you appeal to all three groups, but still remain ‘on-message’ throughout a consumer PR campaign?

 

1. Begin with clear messaging

Outlining your key messages at the very start is invaluable. A robust planning process creates an invaluable guideline for any future decisions on content.

 

A brainstorm is a great way to get ideas flowing. Some vital talking points include:

  • Keywords to describe the product – bright, fun, tactile, soft, unique, adorable, cool
  • How does this toy make people feel – is it a comforting item, does it make a child feel grown up, is it designed to make them laugh, does it bring joy?
  • What is its purpose – is it just for fun, does it have an educational element?

 

You will then need to refine these ideas, selecting the words and phrases that resonate most strongly with the item. With your choices made, these key messages become the starting point for content creation.

 

Though the tone of the content will change dependent upon its intended audience, your key messages will remain consistent. This will ensure that each piece complements one another and, most importantly, becomes part of a unified campaign.

 

2. Utilise different tactics

Once your key messages have been agreed, you can begin to think about the tactics that will be used to increase awareness of your product.

 

This is one of the clear benefits to investing in PR; there are several tactics that can be considered and used, including:

 

  • Press drops

Once you’ve established your media targets and contacts, engage them with a press drop.

 

This could be a simple box containing the product and press release or it could be something more interactive. Creating a drop that is visually appealing will really make your delivery stand out from the many others which are bound to land on the journalist’s desk that day.

 

  • Influencer engagement

Bloggers and influencers are becoming an ever more valuable resource when it comes to spreading the word about new products.

 

Making contact with those who are relevant to your product and target audience can have far-reaching benefits for your campaign.

 

Find out more about how to choose the right influencer for your brand here.

 

  • Competitions

Offer people a chance to win! Better still, engineer the competition so that it spreads the word about your product.

 

Organising a social media giveaway, either on your own social platforms or on those of a relevant and credible partner, is a fantastic way to create noise around your offering.

 

As part of the entry process, ask that your post is liked or shared. Perhaps even incorporate a relevant hashtag to increase awareness of your product or brand. If your toy becomes in demand, you’ll likely spread the message about your item while increasing your brand’s social media following at the same time.

 

One watch-out however is to ensure that you are putting in place the correct governance and that anything that is gifted is mentioned within any post that is shared. If this doesn’t happen, you can end up in some very hot water!

 

  • Events

Dependent on the item, hosting an event which invites people to engage with your item can be a fantastic tactic when it comes to increasing awareness and love for your product.

 

In this case, creating a small area where children are free to come and explore the toy itself, is sure to have them tugging at their parents’ sleeves requesting that your product features on their next Christmas or birthday list!

 

However, a word of warning – events which deliver a quality experience can be a rather expensive commitment and should be costed before any commitment is made.

 

3. Maximise social channels

In this case, taking a single channel approach is unlikely to yield the remarkable results that you are expecting. Nor will churning out the same content across each platform.

Instead, do your research. Carefully look into each platform. Consider the typical age demographic, then craft and distribute your content accordingly.

After all, what appeals to a 7-year-old, may not resonate quite so well with a 60-year-old.

 

4. YouTube

These days, YouTube is a staple in the homes of most school-aged children. As a result, the famous ‘un-boxing’ videos are an effective way of sharing the excitement that comes with the latest ‘must-have’ toys with children and their parents.

 

Summary

There’s no doubt that planning a PR campaign takes a lot of work, which is why it’s most definitely a job best entrusted to the professionals.

Learn a little more about what we do here at Open Comms here. If you’d like to discuss an upcoming campaign, simply give us a call on 01924 862477.

NEW YEAR, NEW PERSPECTIVE AND A BRAND-NEW YOU

It’s a brand-new year and the possibilities are endless. The perfect opportunity to put pen to paper and note down any New Year’s resolutions which will make the next twelve months better than the last.

However, while the arrival of a new decade may be positive for some, it can be infinitely challenging for others.

Whichever scenario describes your 2019, here’s a little positivity to begin 2020 which could, quite possibly, be your best year yet!

Perfection is a myth

There’s no denying that each year presents plenty of reason to celebrate. But, with success comes moments of difficulty, feelings of failure and, perhaps, some memories that we’d really rather forget.

No matter what social media tells us, the ‘perfect’ life rarely exists. There are some moments that are undeniably sad, and it’s these times that can have us questioning what we did wrong?

In the most part, a happy life is merely a matter of perspective. Take the time to cherish the positives and celebrate achievements, however small. Only with the right mindset will positivity be able to prevail.

Don’t be a stranger

Following a period which is traditionally spent surrounded by friends and family, a New Year can be an extremely lonely time for some.

Family fallouts are all too common and, I’m sure, a regret that weighs heavily on people’s hearts. It’s never too late to try and bury the hatchet.

If friends and family are not around, take a positive step to meet others. There are many groups, coffee mornings or sports clubs which can be a fantastic way to establish friendships.

Understand your value

Some people are simply more considerate than others. It’s a hard fact that can be difficult to accept and a source of much upset.

However, moving on from situations that are detrimental to your happiness is important. After all, many of us have come to realise that life really is too short.

Give a little kindness

Kindness costs nothing, so give it freely – not only to others, but also to yourself.

It’s amazing what impact a thoughtful comment, offer of support or small gesture can have on someone else’s life.

New Year, new you

In this time of endless opportunity, relish the chance to be the author of your latest chapter in the whirlwind that is life. Setting realistic expectations while also challenging yourself will give you balance. There is no point in creating an unachievable list of tasks from the get-go.

Split your hopes and dreams into sub-categories and spend a little time each month pushing yourself closer to where you want to be. Taking steps forward is more positive than standing still.

For a few more tips on making 2020 a year of progress, read Open Communications PR Account Executive, Nick Hill’s latest blog here.

THREE KEY TIPS TO START 2020 AS A YEAR OF PROGRESS

2019 is over. Let that sink in.

The older I get the more I find myself asking the same question every time 1st December appears on the calendar. No, it’s not whether I will finally make it to Santa’s nice list but more where has the year gone?

If this sounds familiar, and you find yourself in a constant state of confusion trying to figure out how another 12 months have come and gone in a flash, then I’d recommend taking some time over the Christmas holidays to have a period of deep, self-reflection.

Whether it’s looking at the good and bad both professionally and personally, having a cathartic release at the end of the year can be an extremely powerful tool for moving forward, but only if you are truly honest with yourself.

Celebrate the successes!

If you’ve achieved new client wins, contract extensions, new hires or overall business growth, you must recognise the triumphs that your hard work has delivered. With that being said, it is equally as important to evaluate the failures. I believe that taking stock of these combined experiences allows us to learn, progress and ultimately reach our full potential.

So, before 2020 begins and we think about what we will be thinking when we sit down one year from now scratching our heads as to where another twelve months has gone, I have put together a list of my three top tips to help immerse yourself in the here and now.

  1. Journal writing

Start the new year by dedicating yourself to writing a journal or diary entry. Whether its daily, weekly or even monthly, putting pen to paper can often prompt reflection and force you to remember key experiences and moments that would have otherwise been forgotten.

Not only does this allow you to keep on track of your ongoing activity, meetings and workload, but it also can be used as a prompt to generate new ideas and strategies. Furthermore, it could act as a blueprint, outlining what has and hasn’t worked in the past which can be used to help form new decisions for the future.

  1. Monthly comparisons

Measuring progress can be done in many different forms, depending on what area of the workplace you are looking to assess. Whether it’s an analytical approach, goal oriented or from an economic perspective, comparing and contrasting your progress can indicate which areas need reviewing and which areas you are performing most strongly in.

Identifying what worked, but more importantly what didn’t work, is a practical way of assessing how you’ve either been successful or fallen short in many critical aspects of the workplace.

Becoming aware of your shortcomings, no matter how big or small, will not only help you eliminate the fear of making the same mistakes, but it will also highlight your strengths and how you’ve been able to use these to achieve success.

Once the month is over, repeated the process.

  1. Self-imposed breaks

Whether you are completing long or short  projects, reaching deadlines or simply trying to manage an increasing workload, taking a break in a busy period can often feel detrimental to your work, especially when you feel as if you are performing at a high level.

Realistically, however, you have to ask yourself how long this can be maintained before hitting the proverbial brick wall. Operating at a rapid pace will eventually leave you feeling overwhelmed, unfocused and frustrated, all of which combined will lead to a drop in overall productivity. To avoid such a scenario, we must allow ourselves to step back and take a much-needed break.

Whether its twenty minutes, an hour, a day, week, month or longer; the ability to step back, refocus and revaluate what you are trying to achieve can be such a valuable skill to have. Implementing this practise into the workplace will not only encourage you to stay mindful of your ambitions, but it will also help you understand when you are at full capacity and unable to deliver your desired end goals.

Practise what I preach

The purpose of each of all three tips is to ensure we become self-aware of our strengths and weaknesses, which then allows us to identify and address critical areas of improvement. We strive to be better today than we were yesterday, therefore we must show significant signs of growth year on year.

As we expect to get even busier in 2020 at Open Comms, I will be making sure to implement all three tips as soon as we return in January. Whether its crafting a press release, rolling out a social media campaign or securing media coverage for our growing list of clients, it is critical that I constantly work towards building on the success already achieved and improving the less developed aspects of my skillset.